The turning of the page

Greetings and Salutations dear Marshmallow Peeps,

It’s been a minute hasn’t it? Firstly, I’d like to apologize for being so spotty with the Eat the Marshmallow updates. You deserve more than what we have been able to provide. What this simply reveals is this; running this online magazine/ blog is too much for what I’m currently being ask to juggle. As I have mentioned before, the pandemic caused all of us here at ETM to have to take on more than what we were used to managing with the forced convergence of life and work. As with you, having all aspects of life happening in the same space at the same time was too much for us with withstand. As the pandemic has drawn on, our contributors have had to adapt to their new schedules and expectations. So, it is with a very heavy heart that I tell you this will be the last post on Eat the Marshmallow. The site will be up until March 2022, so you can still read through our posts until then. For the month of December, I will be re-posting a few articles from the past that remain relevant today. 

Though I am sad that we are closing this chapter, I cannot express the depth of gratitude I feel to everyone who has been involved with ETM over the years. Here’s what happening with our team. Our lovely contributing writer Vinay has been exceptionally busy since the start of pandemic with her therapy caseload ballooning. She has shifted her full focus and attention to her therapy practice. Our intrepid, boots-on-the-ground educator Kelly has gone back to teaching his 5th graders in-person and is very very happy to be back in the classroom with them. My partner-in-crime and ETM co-captain Maki is busy writing and illustrating her own graphic novel. And as for me, I am currently turning my focus back to my fine art roots and I’m excited to see where that leads me. 

It is strange to be saying goodbye, because in many ways, ETM has had a life of its own and is inextricably connected to you, our dear readers. This is why, before I sign off, I want to recommend a few excellent resources for caregivers of children who are creative, alternative learners that defy categorization: 

Understood.org is site dedicated to support parents and caregivers of the one in five children with learning and attention issues.

Mindful.org is a mission-driven non-profit dedicated to inspiring, guiding, and connecting anyone who wants to explore mindfulness—to enjoy better health, more caring relationships, and a compassionate society.

Teaching For Change provides teachers and parents with the tools to create schools where students learn to read, write and change the world. Teaching for Change operates from the belief that schools can provide students the skills, knowledge and inspiration to be citizens and architects of a better world — or they can fortify the status quo. By drawing direct connections to real world issues, Teaching for Change encourages teachers and students to question and re-think the world inside and outside their classrooms, build a more equitable, multicultural society, and become active global citizens.

Itgetsbetter.org  has a mission to communicate to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth around the world that it gets better, and to create and inspire the changes needed to make it better for them.

Mindshift explores the future of learning and how we raise our kids. They report on how teaching is evolving to better meet the needs of students and how caregivers can better guide their children. This means examining the role of technology, discoveries about the brain, racial and gender bias in education, social and emotional learning, inequities, mental health and many other issues that affect students. They report on shifts in how educators teach as they apply innovative ideas to help students learn.

I hope these sites serve you well into you and your families’ healthy and happy futures.

In gratitude,

Anouck 

Happy and Safe Holidays to you all! ~ Anouck + Maki

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